First Maryland Regiment Roster

A key part of this project is to compile a roster of all the men of the First Maryland Regiment who fought at the Battle of Brooklyn. The document linked below lists the names of all known members of the First Maryland and the seven Independent companies, whether they were present at the Battle of Brooklyn, if known, as well as everything known about their fate at the battle. The information in this database comes from the initial muster rolls from early 1776, as well as scattered pay records, soldiers’ pensions, correspondence, and other sources.

We do not know the names of all the soldiers, nor do we know what happened to many of them. Although the Council of Safety ordered that a full muster roll be compiled when the army left for New York, and Col. William Smallwood later transmitted a list of all men who were killed or captured, neither of these lists has survived. There are three companies for which we have identified fewer than half the soldiers: the Fifth, Fifth Independent, and Seventh Independent.

roster

Click here to view the roster

In total, all nine companies commanded by Col. Smallwood fought at the battle, along with the Fourth, Fifth, and Seventh Independent Companies (the other four Independents did not arrive in New York until sometime after the battle). If the Maryland troops had been at full strength, there would have been eight companies of 74 men; one company of 78 men; and three companies of 104 men, for a total of 982. However, we know that not every company was at full strength. Some were short of men before the army left for New York, and illness and desertion further reduced the ranks. The Company Strength section of the roster shows what we know about how many men were present at given times. A few notes about using the roster:

  • To search, either use the Find feature (ctrl + F), or download the full document.
  • The column At Battle indicates whether we each soldier is to have been present with his unit at the Battle of Brooklyn; soldiers marked “probably” are known to have been in a unit that fought, but we have no specific information about an individual’s presence.
  • The column Status After Battle includes what is known to each soldier–whether they were wounded (WIA) killed (KIA) or captured (POW). For many soldiers, we know only that they were alive (usually because they are included in later records). Some of those listed as “alive” may have been captured.

If you have questions about anything you see here, please leave a comment below or send an email to msamaryland400@gmail.com. This roster is a work in progress, and we will continue to improve  it.

Click here to view the roster! You may also download to roster as a spreadsheet by clicking here.

Advertisements

23 Responses to First Maryland Regiment Roster

  1. Pingback: Who Were the Maryland 400? | Finding the Maryland 400

  2. Pingback: Introducing the Interactive Map | Finding the Maryland 400

  3. List of Hessian soldiers who fought in Maryland and stayed in America. Where do I find this information

    Like

    • Carolyn,

      Thanks for your comment. Hessian troops never actually fought in Maryland. However, there was a German regiment in the Continental Army that was raised in Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. In addition, about a quarter of the Hessians settled in America after the war–either deserters or prisoners who decided not to return home, and many likely settled in heavily German areas, such as Western Maryland.

      Some sources that may be helpful for you:

      On the German Regiment:
      Henry J. Retzer, The German Regiment of Maryland and Pennsylvania in the Continental Army/.
      Muster Rolls and Other Records of Service of Maryland Troops in the American Revolution.
      Archives of Maryland Online, vol. 18: http://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/speccol/sc2900/sc2908/000001/000018/html/

      On Hessians:
      David Hackett Fischer, Washington’s Crossing contains a discussion of sources re: Hessian troops in the Revolution on pages 483-484. See also p. 379 re: Hessians staying in American, and captured Hessians being sent to Winchester, VA after the battles of Trenton and Princeton.

      ​I hope this helps you, but let me know if you have any other ​
      ​questions. Thanks for checking out our blog!

      Owen​

      Like

  4. Robert Gould says:

    Hello- great site. It is nice to see some fresh research being done into this subject. Interest in the Battle of Long Island seems to come and go. I am an artist currently living working in Brooklyn near the battlefield, but I am originally from Maryland. I have been creating some original art work based on this battle. Please check out my art on my blog. http://robertgouldhistoricalartist.blogspot.com/
    I have created a painting using the names of the soldiers from the Maryland Regiments. You can see it here
    http://robertgouldhistoricalartist.blogspot.com/2012/11/maryland-regiment-willow-leaves.html

    Like

  5. Sue Vanzant, nee Gaither says:

    Ensign Henry Chew Gaither witnessed the last will written by Lt. Daniel Bowie on August 26, 1776, the day before Bowie was kittled on the battle field during the Battle of Brooklyn Heights or Long Island. You have the letter on the Finding the 400 site. Wouldn’t that give more than a “probably” that Gaither was part of the 400 fighting at the stone house.

    Like

    • Sue,

      You’re absolutely correct! That certainly is an indication that Gaither was there, and we’ve updated the roster. Thank you for letting us know about the oversight.

      Owen

      Like

  6. Pingback: Welcome to Finding the Maryland 400 | Finding the Maryland 400

  7. Sarah Stone says:

    Hello i love your site! My name is Sarah Stone I’m 14 and I’m related to John Hoskins Stone. 🙂

    Like

    • Hi Sarah,

      Thanks, I’m glad you like it. It’s always amazing how much Maryland’s Revolutionary War history is still all around us!

      We’re going to have lots of new posts coming soon, so stay tuned!

      Owen

      Like

  8. Bil Wiseman says:

    Hello: I descend from Thomas Wiseman, the Pvt. who lost his two middle fingers on his left hand. His wife was named Agnes. Thomas died Oct 9th, 1825 and Agnes died in Oct of 1825 also in Edgefield County, SC. Their son was Named Daniel Wiseman, his wife is unknown that had all the children: Thomas Wiseman, Judge William Crawford Wiseman, John S. Wiseman, Elijah Abner Wiseman, Simeon Wiseman and James M. Wiseman and they had 2 girls. I have over 3800 descendants of Thomas Wiseman who was born 1750 in Smallburgh, Norfork, England. He was supposedly caught stealing a loaf of bread and sentenced to serve his time on a Southern Plantation which just happened to be Maryland. My Wiseman Book is in the Thompkins Library in Edgefield, SC.

    Bill Wiseman
    A Son of the Republic of Texas
    gbwiseman@friendlycity.net

    Like

    • Thank you so much for your comment! Wiseman’s story is one of my favorites, especially his insistence on calling Camden “Gate’s defeat” so many years later. The account of his life in his pension seems very human.

      I would love to learn more about his family background, if you have information/sources that you can share. I recall that I had trouble running down reliable information on him before he enlisted (there are several men with the same name who kept getting mixed up). If you can, please email me at msamaryland400@gmail.com.

      Thanks again!
      Owen Lourie

      Like

      • Bil Wiseman says:

        Hi Owen: I tried to e-mail you but could not successfully sign in—too old I guess.
        Thomas Wiseman was most likely born in Smallburg, Norfolk, England in 1750 according to Peter Colson Wison’s records of Bonded Servants.

        Actually, Thomas was a white slave as he was caught stealing a loaf of Bread and sentenced to serve on a Southern Plantation in 1767. There were 5 ships that left London during the winter on 1767-68 but I have not found Thomas on the manifest of any of the ships. Could have been under his owner’s name. You have his service record and it is mixed up with Thomas Wiseman of New York who had a large family and married Abigail McIntyre in Mass and moved to New York and had a large family which can be found on the New York 1800-1820 census.

        Thomas’s son was Daniel Wiseman (his 2nd wife’s name was Ann Wisdom Mays who was the widow of Gardner Mays of Edgefield; all of Daniel’s children were born before Daniel married Ann Wisdom Mays) who had 6 sons and 2 daughters and in 1823 was guardian to 3 Coatney children. All of the sons went to Texas except James M. Wiseman who died in an Illinois Union Prison during the Civil War. I found that Thomas and Daniel and a John Smith were signers of a single document together there in Edgefield. This is the only document that links Thomas and Daniel together other than they are the only Wisemans in Edgefield County during their life. There is a Carter Family Ledger in the Thompkins Library that shows Thomas and Agnes Wiseman death dates and mentions 3 of Daniel’s sons in Mr. Carter’s School there in Edgefield County in 1822-1823. This is a link of Daniel and Thomas Wiseman.

        I found that Thomas Wiseman in 1776 was in the 4th Company of the Maryland 1st Regiment and Capt. Thomas Ewing was the commander. I can find Nathaniel Ewing commanding the 6th Company but have not been able to actually find Thomas Wiseman in that 6th Company. Any help or direction would be appreciated. I have published several articles on my Wiseman family in various sources. I am a Texan by birth but live in Georgia now.
        If possible comment to my e-mail: gbwiseman@friendlycity.net
        Regards,

        Bill Wiseman

        Like

  9. Pingback: First Maryland Regiment Roster | Our Hidden Roots

  10. Pingback: Burkely Hermann’s Introduction | Finding the Maryland 400

  11. Is (Rev.) Hatch Dent, Jr., on your roster? Sections of it are in alphabetical order, though not the whole, but I wasn’t able to find his name when I looked through the list. He is listed in the Maryland Achives as being a Second “Lieutenant in the Ninth Company (Light Infantry) of the First Maryland Regiment.”

    Like

    • He is! The roster (and list of published biographies) are both organized by company, with the officers first, than privates in alphabetical order. Try searching the page by typing “ctrl + f” and searching for Dent.

      Like

      • Thanks. Putting in ‘Dent’ first brought up someone else, with the ‘dent’ part of the word ‘resident’ found. – I then looked up ‘hatch’ and he came up first.

        It told me nothing I didn’t already know from his MD Archives Bio, but I wanted to make sure he was on the roster.

        Like

      • Great, I’m glad you could find him. The roster is admittedly a bit overwhelming. A lot of what’s there is meant for project staff to save information and track our progress. One day, when we finish writing biographies of all the soldiers, we’ll be able to replace the roster page with something that’s easier to use.

        Like

  12. Claire Morris says:

    Great to see the roster online. Thanks for doing all of this work. I am a reenactor in the UK in a small group portraying the 1st Maryland, so this information will be invaluable.
    Kind Regards
    Claire Morris
    UK

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s